FALLING TO EARTH by Kate Southwood

FALLING TO EARTH is the kind of novel that makes me want to grab the very next person I see and urgently say, ”You MUST read this.” I read this rabidly with increasing awe and respect that Kate Southwood had the chops to create a debut novel with this degree of psychological insight, restrained power, and heartbreaking beauty.

The story centers on a tragedy of unimaginable proportions – a tornado hits the small Illinois town of March in 1925, causing devastation and grievous loss in the homes of every single resident of the town.

Except one.

March 5, 2014 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,  · Posted in: Debut Novel, Facing History, Family Matters, Literary, US Midwest

ORDINARY THUNDERSTORMS by William Boyd

In British author Boyd’s capable hands it’s actually believable that a slightly depressed, mild-mannered climatologist chooses to go underground in a strange city rather than report a murder.

Born in Britain, Adam Kindred has lived in America most of his life. Now, newly, devastatingly divorced, he’s left his U.S. university job and hopes for a new start with a fellowship in London. Fresh from the job interview, he treats himself to a meal, exchanges pleasantries with another solitary diner and afterwards discovers that the man – a research doctor – has left a file behind.

March 21, 2010 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: , ,  · Posted in: 2010 Favorites, Character Driven, Literary, Thriller/Spy/Caper, United Kingdom, y Award Winning Author

CHANGING HEAVEN by Jane Urquhart

A brilliant riff on Emily Brontë’s WUTHERING HEIGHTS, this highly original novel is as bracing and wild as the weather itself, impossible to pin down, virtually plotless, yet sweeping all before it. Just as one speaks of a novel of ideas, this is a novel of emotions — emotions in their purest form, taking possession like a natural force, and largely divorced from the normal ties of cause and effect. This is not a book for those who demand realism and logic rather than a novel organized by poetic association and contrast. But for those who approach it as the unique vision of a poet who just happens to be writing in prose — wondrous prose — it is something very special indeed.

October 4, 2009 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: , ,  · Posted in: Canada, Character Driven, Classic, United Kingdom, y Award Winning Author