MACHINE MAN by Max Barry

MACHINE MAN, an off-kilter tale of a man who accidentally loses a leg and who then discovers that the enhanced replacement is more efficient than the original, seems to be the natural progression of Max’s grimly hilarious, eccentric, yet uncannily spot-on skewering of corporate culture.

August 19, 2011 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: ,  · Posted in: Humorous, Satire, Scifi

DAMAGE by John Lescroart

The arch villain in John Lescroart’s DAMAGE is Roland Curtlee, the pampered son of Cliff and Theresa Curtlee. The Curtlees are a wealthy and politically connected couple who own San Francisco’s number two newspaper, the Courier. Ro has been released from prison after serving nine years, well shy of his original sentence–twenty-five years to life. Although Ro was found guilty of raping and murdering his family’s housekeeper, Dolores Sandoval, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeal reversed the conviction and ordered a new trial. This leaves the new San Francisco District Attorney, Wes Farrell, in an awkward position. The Curtlees supported Wes’s candidacy and provided him with favorable press coverage. Now they expect payback. They want Ro to be freed on bail and furthermore, they do not want him to be retried.

January 4, 2011 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: , , ,  · Posted in: California, Sleuths Series

STRANGERS AT THE FEAST by Jennifer Vanderbes

Let me say it straight out: STRANGERS AT THE FEAST is astoundingly GOOD. Page-turning, jaw-dropping, laugh-out-loud, cry-into-your-sleeves, gasp-with-recognition GOOD. It takes on nothing less than the theme of what is wrong with America today and it does it very well.

The action takes place over one Thanksgiving day with lots of flashbacks. There hasn’t been a family like the Olsons since Zoe Heller’s The Believers – with a dollop of the movie Pieces of April blended in. This family DEFINES dysfunction.

November 24, 2010 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: , , , ,  · Posted in: Contemporary, Family Matters, NE & New York

THE WINDUP GIRL by Paolo Bacigalupi

Unlike much of the world, the Thai Kingdom had avoided inundation by the rising oceans. It had avoided pandemic decimation of crops and population. It had kept the global agri-corporations from accessing and either exploiting or destroying its vast and precious seed banks. It had taken drastic, isolationist steps to preserve itself while most of the rest of the world faltered into massive contraction and potential extinction.

The white shirts of the Environment Ministry enforced the official policy of the Child Queen’s regime, burning fields and villages if genetic blight or plague struck, conducting customs inspections of the expensive goods imported on dirigibles and confiscating and destroying even items supposedly protected by large bribes. And, “mulching” any windups they discovered.

May 14, 2010 · Judi Clark · 3 Comments
Tags: , , , , , ,  · Posted in: Hugo Award, Nebula Award Winner, Scifi, Speculative (Beyond Reality)

31 BOND STREET by Ellen Horan

31 BOND STREET, by Ellen Horan, is the address of Dr. Harvey Burdell, a smooth-talking dentist with big ambitions. The setting is New York City, seven years before the Civil War. Burdell’s housemistress, thirty-six year old Emma Cunningham, has two daughters, eighteen and fifteen, but her late husband left her nearly destitute. She fervently hopes that Burdell will take her under his wing and solve her financial woes. However, her fortunes take a downward spiral when the dentist is found slaughtered in his own home. Who had the motive, means and opportunity to commit this horrific crime? Reporters speculate that Emma was either a gold digging monster or an innocent victim of circumstance. When the authorities finally arrest her, Emma hires an idealistic and determined defense attorney named Oliver Clinton. His opponent, Abraham Oakey Hall, is an aggressive and politically connected prosecutor.

April 16, 2010 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: , ,  · Posted in: Debut Novel, Facing History, New York City, Thriller/Spy/Caper