THE SATURDAY BIG TENT WEDDING PARTY by Alexander McCall Smith

Here are some of the things that make us smile: the sight of a beautiful baby, a glorious spring day, a sincere compliment, and a new installment, THE SATURDAY BIG TENT WEDDING PARTY, in Alexander McCall Smith’s wonderful series featuring Precious Ramotswe. The “traditionally built” Mma Ramotswe is happily married to Mr. J. L. B. Matekoni, proprietor of Tlokweng Road Speedy Motors, and along with her associate, the bespectacled and highly efficient Grace Makutsi, contentedly operates the No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency in Gaborone. Little has changed, except that the date of Grace’s wedding to Mr. Phuti Radiphuti is drawing near. The bride has a great deal to do to get ready for this momentous event.

April 1, 2011 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags:  · Posted in: Africa, Sleuths Series, World Lit

THE UNBEARABLE LIGHTNESS OF SCONES by Alexander McCall Smith

We read for many reasons, but one of the biggest reasons frequently cited is that books offer an “escape.” How true that is, and books, of course, offer a variety of escapes. There’s the thrill of adventure and romance, and the infinite worlds of science fiction. But there’s another escape too–an escape into a simpler, cozier world in which, if the truth is told, the lives of some fictional characters seem enviable. And this brings me to Alexander McCall Smith’s 44 Scotland Street series.

April 1, 2011 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: , , , ,  · Posted in: Humorous, Sleuths Series, United Kingdom

TEA TIME FOR THE TRADITIONALLY BUILT by Alexander McCall Smith

Not a believer that change is entirely for the better in Botswana society, Mma Precious Ramotswe, the “traditionally built” owner of the No.1 Ladies Detective Agency in Gaborone, has decided that cars are among the biggest agents of change, making people lazy. She has therefore decided to walk the two miles each way to her office, located beside the garage where her husband Mr. J. L. B. Matekoni operates a car repair service. She secretly admits, however, that the real reason she is walking is that her beloved little white van, now twenty-two years old, is making strange noises, and she fears that when Mr. J. L. B. Matekoni hears them that he will decide her little van can no longer be repaired.

May 27, 2009 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: , , ,  · Posted in: Africa, Sleuths Series, World Lit