Archive for October, 2011

HELL AND GONE by Duane Swierczynski

HELL AND GONE, another nail-biting read from author Duane Swierczynski is the second volume in the Charlie Hardie Trilogy. I

October 31, 2011 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: , ,  · Posted in: Psychological Suspense, Speculative (Beyond Reality), Thriller/Spy/Caper

THE GREAT LEADER by Jim Harrison

Once, many years ago when I was living in Northern Michigan, Jim Harrison walked into the restaurant where I was dining. He didn’t so much walk in, in retrospect, as lumber in. It was the Blue Bird Cafe and I confess that I’d been hanging out there in the hopes of catching a glimpse of him.

October 30, 2011 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: ,  · Posted in: Contemporary, Literary, Mystery/Suspense, US Midwest

LIGHT FROM A DISTANT STAR by Mary McGarry Morris

Nellie Peck is thirteen years old going on forty. She is wise, intelligent and impulsive. Despite her precociousness, however, she is still a child. She lives with her parents and two siblings, Ruth and Henry; Ruth is a half-sister from a relationship that her mother had in high school. The Pecks are struggling financially. Nellie’s mother works as a hair dresser and Nellie’s father owns a hardware store that is slowly going under. Her father’s passion is his writing – he is writing a tome about the history of their town, Springvale. His goal is to get it self-published so that it can be read by a wide audience.

October 26, 2011 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: , , ,  · Posted in: Contemporary, Family Matters

THE SUBMISSION by Amy Waldman

The brilliance of Amy Waldman’s book is that she does not try to apply logic to why 9/11 occurred, nor does she attempt to recreate the complex and traumatic emotions that most Americans felt that day. Instead, she explores something broader: the fallout of a country confused, divided, and sick with fear, clamoring to make sense of the insensible.

October 25, 2011 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: , ,  · Posted in: Contemporary, Debut Novel, New York City, Reading Guide

WHAT I TALK ABOUT WHEN I TALK ABOUT RUNNING by Haruki Murakami

In his running journal-cum-memoir, WHAT I TALK ABOUT WHEN I TALK ABOUT RUNNING , titled in obvious homage to Raymond Carver, Haruki Murakami claims that “people basically become runners because they’re meant to” –I know exactly what he means. Runners are different; if only for the fact they think nothing of doubling up socks to run in 20-degree weather while incredulous spouses look on; they brave downpours for the bliss of having paths to themselves; they passionately debate the relative merits of Body Glide vs. Vaseline, bare feet vs. high-tech shoes, real food vs. GU gels. Runners know it’s possible, even enjoyable, to be alone for hours, pushing themselves “to acquire a void” and these quirks of temperament are often enough to form a bond with other distance runners.

October 23, 2011 · Judi Clark · One Comment
Tags: , ,  · Posted in: Non-fiction

THE AFFAIR by Lee Child

What’s a writer to do when his action hero ages? One option is to go back in time.

In THE AFFAIR, Lee Child flashes back to 1997, when Major Jack Reacher (his thirty-six year old protagonist and first-person narrator) was an army MP. Leon Garber, Reacher’s commanding officer, sends Jack to Carter Crossing, Mississippi, to monitor a potentially explosive situation.

October 22, 2011 · Judi Clark · No Comments
Tags: ,  · Posted in: Sleuths Series, Thriller/Spy/Caper, US South